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Trends in the Workplace for Women in 2018 and our coming NZ WEPs events

Forbes Magazine in December 2017 identified five top trends for women in the workplace in 2018.
(Refer: https://www.forbes.com/sites/georgenehuang/2017/12/29/top-5-trends-to-expect-for-women-in-the-workplace-in-2018/#1414aae32fa5)
The five trends were:

  1. Continued scrutiny about sexual harassment culture
  2. Expanded employer-sponsored training on sexual harassment and new policy adoption
  3. Improved parental leave policies – including gender neutral or “primary caregiver” policies
  4. Greater workplace flexibility
  5. Disclosure of diversity data

And yes, this was speaking to American business, but those trends are very real and to the front in New Zealand workplaces today.
Picking up on these trends the UN Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs) committee will be running panel events in Auckland and Wellington to assist our signatories come to grips with these issues and look at policies that can be put in place.   A workshop on Sexual Harassment policies in the workplace will be run in late May and later in the year there will be an event on Managing a Flexible Workforce.
Watch for the invitations!  They will be coming shortly for the Sexual Harassment event.
Our annual survey (coming out in July) gives each signatory the opportunity to work through diversity data and helps signatories achieve Principle 7 of measuring and publicly reporting on progress to achieve gender equality.
The NZ WEPs committee looks forward to encouraging more business leaders to use the seven Women’s Empowerment Principles through 2018 as guide posts for actions that advance and empower women in the workplace. We know that for signatories the equal treatment of women and men is not just the right thing to do — it is also good for business and needs to be a priority.  

In this e-Newsletter
1. Trends in the workplace for women in 2018 and our coming NZ WEPs events
2.  2018 and WEPs in New Zealand
3. Welcome to the new signatory, Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology




 
2018 and WEPs in New Zealand
It’s 2018 and gender equality is a high priority in 2018 for an increasing number of businesses and organisations around the world.  The UN WEPs committee in New Zealand is proud to be part of a movement to empower women in the workplace and congratulates our signatory organisations for showing support for gender equity in the workplace by signing on to the UN Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs), a partnership initiative of United Nations Women and the United Nations Global Compact Office to empower women in business.   The WEPs have been signed by more than 1,700 business leaders around the world, and over fifty-five business leaders in New Zealand.
The UN WEPs committee in New Zealand (made up of five partner organisations who work collaboratively and voluntarily to promote the WEPs) thank those organisations who have already donated to us this year to help resource our cause.   All signatories have been asked to assist us financially in 2018.  The annual membership donation will be used in 2018 to:
  • Continue to fund the services of our Administrator, Gen Brown
  • Streamline our annual survey to provide a better tool for signatories looking to use it in setting targets around the principles and to help signatories better use this information to achieve Principle 7 of measuring and publicly reporting on progress to achieve gender equality.  We use donations to ensure that the survey is professionally created, tested and analysed.
  • Use the survey results to highlight best practice through the White Camellia Awards
  • Organise launches in regional areas to assist more organisations to become WEPs signatories
  • Investigate the provision of workshops to build practical understanding around the WEPs Gender Equality Workplace Strategy (a signatory only resource).
  • Organise panel events in 2018 on Sexual Harassment in the Workplace and on Managing a Flexible Workforce.  We are looking to livestream these events to provide value to regional signatories.
  • Provide further resources to signatories through our webpage and social media
We are most appreciative of your financial help to support our activities and enable us to provide greater support to participating organisations and grow the number of WEPs signatories.
Welcome to new signatory, Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology
At a stakeholder event held at Mokoia Campus on on the 21st February, Toi Ohomai Chief Executive Leon Fourie said the organisation was delighted to become a signatory and take a leading role to achieving gender equality in the workplace. At Toi Ohomai, women make up 61% of staff, 50% of the executive leadership team and 55% of the leadership team.
 
“We are committed to establishing and demonstrating a high level of corporate leadership in this area and will continue to use our size and influence to work towards women’s rights,” Dr Fourie said.
 
Vicky Mee, Chair of the NZ WEPs committee, was pleased that Toi Ohomai, as an educational institute, had joined UN WEPs because young people being exposed to good modelling of gender equality at work is so important, she said.  “We want young people to see a mixture of men and women working together in managerial roles so we are delighted that Toi Ohomai is now going to join us and demonstrate their commitment to gender equality.”
Toi Ohomai Executive Director, Strategic Partnerships and Māori Success, Ana Morrison who is leading the UN WEPs initiative at the Institute, said she would now work closely with UN WEPs to implement a plan using the resources and expertise available, and contextualise this to the unique Toi Ohomai demographic.
WEPs Signatory Certificate presented to Cathy Cooney, Chair of the Te Ohomai Council, and CEO of Te Ohomai, Dr Leon Fourie by Vicky Mee, the Chair of WEPs
View the WEPs Website here
Copyright © 2018 WEP's NZ, All rights reserved.


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