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🔨 September 2017
Newsletter
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Purchase of a home in Quimper Village is offered and available only to individuals/couples whose principal residence is the State of Washington and who have obtained membership in Townsend Meadows Cooperative by way of its Offering Memorandum. 
Our reliable and fun-loving Woodchips have been busy getting the shop ready. Here Mack and Jack are enjoying the new biscuit joiner they've acquired.
The interior of the workshop. The cabinets have all been gleaned from 'tear-outs' of other projects in Port Townsend.
QUIMPER VILLAGE WEB PAGE
EVEN MORE Construction Photos - click here
Learn about Co-Housing
VISIT Port Townsend
🍀  Tip-Toe Through the Clover  🍀
 (A friendly message from your friendly Landscape Team)

Put your mind at ease. There is no need to plant your front and back gardens immediately.
 
This fall and winter, crimson clover will carpet our yards and the common areas around the Grass Pave and the Common House. In September, the sandy soil will be raked, then amended with top soil and seeded. With luck, the seasonal rains will take care of the watering.
 
Think of crimson clover as a living mulch. It will protect and enrich the soil over the winter while we concern ourselves with this audacious experience of co-housing.
 
Then, in the spring, when the gardening bug bites, it will bloom red and glorious.  This is the perfect time to ‘harvest’ the clover. Mow it, turn it over, let it rot, then dig the residue into the soil.  Now you are ready to plant your garden.
These photos (above) are of the common house - the last structure to be completed. The afternoon sun adds shadowy beauty to the scene.
Tip-Toe Through the Clover
A friendly message from your friendly Landscape Team
 
Put your mind at ease. There is no need to plant your front and back gardens immediately.
 
This fall and winter, crimson clover will carpet our yards and the common areas around the Grass Pave and the Common House. In September, the sandy soil will be raked, then amended with top soil and seeded. With luck, the seasonal rains will take care of the watering.
 
Think of crimson clover as a living mulch. It will protect and enrich the soil over the winter while we concern ourselves with this audacious experience of co-housing.
 
Then, in the spring, when the gardening bug bites, it will bloom red and glorious.  This is the perfect time to ‘harvest’ the clover. Mow it, turn it over, let it rot, then dig the residue into the soil.  Now you are ready to plant your garden.                                                                        
--Araya and Cindy
Escape from Alcatraz
 
Call it cabin fever, call it temporary insanity, whatever the cause, we thought it brilliant to sign up for “The Shark Swim,” aka “Escape from Alcatraz,” in San Francisco Bay. So we did.
 
Now, the whole “shark” thing is a bit melodramatic. Yes, there are Great Whites outside the Golden Gate, but few venture in. The Bay probably has mud sharks like we have in Puget Sound, but it’s mostly hype and adds to bragging rights. The extent of my shark defense was to wear a blue swimsuit, not black, so I didn’t look like a yummy seal. I’ve since learned that sharks use smell more than sight. Good thing I didn’t have herring for breakfast.
 
Since hundreds of people do this swim every year, it is far from impossible. The distance was one mile, very doable for a recreational open water swimmer.  By Puget Sound standards, the water felt almost warm. However, the tides and currents are tricky and can sweep a swimmer right out of the bay into the Pacific, and
its awaiting sharks.
 
But still! It’s Alcatraz! And there could be sharks! And it just sounds ominous.
 
Starting in winter, I believe it was 2003 or 2004, Sue, a friend from work, and I set up a training plan. Laps in the pool until May, Lake Washington until it warmed up too much, then Puget Sound for that last month before the Alcatraz swim in late July. We were ready.
 
Several hundred people gathered at Aquatic Park Beach to get instructions, a yellow swim cap and grease-painted numbers on our shoulder and thigh. In swimsuits and towels we paraded down the San Francisco waterfront to the waiting tour boats and chugged out to Alcatraz. The skipper idled just off the island while the kayaks and Zodiacs maneuvered into place. We lined up and jumped off the boat into the bay, one after the other. The small craft formed a protective flotilla around us as we took off for the SF shore.
 
I found my land mark, stretched out, reaching for shore with each stroke. Stroke after stroke, arms and shoulders moved almost effortlessly. I was grateful for all the training we had done.
 
The bay was a milky cerulean blue, nearly opaque, for which I was grateful. I really did not want to see the creatures calling the Bay home. I especially wished to remain ignorant of any sharks.
 
About half way across, as the skyline started coming into focus, my left foot developed a cramp. Then a charlie horse threatened my calf. I dragged that leg and kicked with just one leg. Not very efficient! Soon both legs were cramped, so I just let them follow along as my arms pulled me closer to the beach. 
 
The water was soft and welcoming, the salt air invigorating. I was at home, at peace. As the sun broke through the damp morning haze, I  flipped over onto my back for a few restful strokes then took in the view.

Since being diagnosed with M.S. earlier in the year, I had struggled with fears of eventually losing my strength, balance, possibly the ability to walk. Cognitive decline, muscle spasms, loss of vision, and whatever havoc my own out-of-control immune system might wreak on my nervous system. My brain and spinal cord were under attack.
 
But that morning, in that bay, feeling strong, I was swimming right through  ‘shark’-infested waters. I was escaping from Alcatraz, the most difficult prison escape of all. I was escaping the prison of my own doubts and fears. Nearing the beach, I felt an intense freedom: If I can swim with the sharks, I can deal with M.S. And, if I can walk along San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf in my swimsuit, I can deal with just about anything that comes my way.                    ---  Cindy A
As we begin to think about packing up our belongs (again for many of us) make sure that you remember the “safe lifting” guides that we all ‘know’, yet seldom recall when we are actually packing and moving things.  Yes, we have lots of time still to begin this process, this is just a reminder so that when you get to your new house this fall, you will be as whole and healthy as possible.           ---PamC




Several members have pets - dogs and cats mostly. Toula is our newest member. She is a rescue from the Center Valley Animal Rescue in Quilcene and can't wait to move in with her person, Araya S. We are considering what chores Toula might help out with.

 






After walking around and meeting dozens of people at our recent site visit, Toula needs a nap!
(And maybe Araya does, too)
Now about Meals
 
           I can make cheeseburgers for two. So I believe I could make them for four or maybe even six. And salad. I can make salad. Not easily if it requires cutting up vegies (I have no fingers;) but still I can make salad. But making a meal for 30 or forty persons would be beyond me, unless I had more than one day to do it. But I can clear tables. I’ve done that at our church. I can deliver food to the tables. I can put dishes in the washer.  I can do a lot more than one might think.
            I’ve talked to other QV-ers who have cooked for that many in their past and feel confident about doing it again. I’ve talked to some who haven’t, but still feel confident that they can. Then again, I’ve talked to some who are nervous about it.
            I don’t know what the ratio is but I’ve read our agreement says there will be three on a team. So it seems only one third of our community needs to actually cook. The rest will be doing the prep, the purchasing, table-setting and clean up. As they participate and watch the main cooks, probably some of this road team will gain enough confidence to be Cooks. Eventually we may have too many cooks and worry about spoiled broth. Alas, I think I will always be on the support team.
           Now what about allergies and dietary preferences?  Some Allergies will always need to be observed, like peanuts. Beyond that, dietary preferences will not need to be accommodated. I believe the agreement reads that it is always the chef’s choice.
           The major distinctions will probably be herbivores and carnivores. Herbivore chefs can probably always throw in a few meatballs. Carnivore cooks can always remove a few meat balls. What about vegans?  They’ll probably need to pick the cheese out of their soup. Gluten free persons? Bring your own bread.  Lactose free?  Bring your own ice cream. Piscivores?  Do they only eat fish, or avoid fish? Let them eat Hake! Never-the-less, there will always be a place at the table for these weird types. Sorry.  
            Is that it?  Have we got meals covered?  Wait, what about paying for them? I think the agreement reads $4 per meal.  So how about you buy a card of ten meals for $40 and check them off as you go along?  Who would be responsible for keeping this up to date?  Well, there is a meals team.                                                                                --JimD

Ready, set, move-everything-today-and-be-completely-settled-tomorrow!!

Ah, to hell with that.  It’s not a race.  Carolyn and I intend to take it slow.  We’ll close our house sale as quickly as we can (paying cash) to establish comparable appraisals for Members getting mortgages. Otherwise, we’re playing turtle.  Remember who won that race?

There’s a lot we don’t and can’t know about our new house.  For instance, will we have enough light when the sun goes down for real, not just for a few minutes of eclipse?  If not, where is the light weak, and what would improve it?  Given the particular orientation of our house, do we need blinds on this window, or that one?  Do we need a high fence to keep Pat and David next-door from peeking at us in our hot tub, or barbed wire to keep them from climbing in with us?  

How ‘bout them closets?  We’ve considered every closet option up to and including walling them off as a place to hide the bodies of our enemies.  For now, we’ve decided to hang our collection of Goodwill rejects on the wooden rods and consider the results.  We may say “good enough” and live with it for the rest of our lives.  Or maybe we’ll find a really good solution.

In short, we don’t plan to run in circles, scream and shout, unless maybe we have too much celebratory champagne.  We aren’t worried about getting exactly the right lights, or closets, or fences, or whatever within a week of moving in.  Shucks, we’ve already got the right neighbors, and we certainly don’t want to get everything else done immediately.  What would we have to keep us busy for the next couple of years?

Hey, we’re already old.  And slow.  What’s the hurry?                          ---Jack

Labor Day in the United States is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, laws and well-being of the country. Celebrate Labor!
Contributors to this issue: JimD, CindyA, PamC, JackS, ArayaS, and CheronD.  Thanks!!
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3105 Sage Lane
Port Townsend, WA 98368


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Quimper Village · 3107 Sage Lane · Port Townsend, WA 98368 · USA

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