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Asian Languages & Cultures (ALC) e-News 
20 January 2021
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Table of Contents

  1. ALC Faculty Highlights
  2. Language Funding
  3. Spring 2021 Courses
  4. Events
  5. Internships & Opportunities
  6. Graduate Student News
  7. Scholarships
  8. Job Posting
  9. Advising Available
  10. Apply to Graduate
ALC Faculty Highlights
Tyrell Haberkorn, ALC faculty member, contributed a piece to the Asian American Writers’ Workshop’s new Syllabus section, for a possible course on “Democracy Dreams: A Pedagogy of Struggle in Thailand.” Organized around categories of actions taken in the service of democracy — recording repression, engaging in dissent, creating archives against domination, tracing the unspeakable, and imagining the future — the syllabus highlights the inspiring and challenging work being done to imagine and make real democracy in the context of Thailand, where the present-day struggle for democracy has multiple histories and endless possibilities awaiting. The syllabus contains capsule reviews of books, exhibits, articles, and archives within these categories. Browse the syllabus here: https://aaww.org/democracy-dreams-a-pedagogy-of-struggle-in-thailand/.
Professor Hongming Zhang has recently released a new book. It is a translation of the #1 textbook on phonology in the west. Its English/original title is Phonology in Generative Grammar by Michael Kenstowicz of MIT. Due to the important role it has played and is still playing in the study of phonology, Professor Hongming Zhang worked with collaborators and spent 14+ years on its translation. Now, its Chinese version (1236 pages in total) was published by the Commercial Press, the top-ranking publishing house in China. Congratulations, Professor!
Dr. Jaerin Ahn received an award from the Instructional Continuity (IC) Small Grant Committee for her proposal of enhancing student-to-student Korean language learning projects online. Congratulations!
Language Funding
Tomorrow at Noon CST
Please join staff from the Wisconsin Intensive Summer Language Institutes for a virtual info session on 

Summer Language & Funding
Thursday, January 21st 
Noon - 1 PM CST

Learn about the amazing summer language institutes @ UW covering languages in Central EurasianSouth Asian, and Southeast Asia, as well as Arabic, Persian and Turkish, and Portuguese.

Hear more about the UW-Madison Project GO program that supports language acquisition for ROTC students interested in studying Hindi, Indonesian, Russian, or Urdu.

Find out how you can be supported to participate in
SAFLI (South Asian Flagship Languages Initiative)
IFLI (Indonesian Flagship Language Initiative)
TURFLI (Turkish Flagship Language Initiative)
Students admitted into a flagship language initiative receive funding to complete a summer intensive in Hindi, Urdu, Indonesian, and Turkish in Madison and then continue their studies overseas in India (SAFLI), Indonesia (IFLI), or Azerbaijan (TURFLI) during the fall semester. These three programs are special initiatives of the Boren Awards for international study and will be hosted by UW-Madison until 2023!

Join Zoom Meeting

https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/97940123492?pwd=aHlWMWF4d3JtT3A3M2d4SzZDWUJEZz09

Meeting ID: 979 4012 3492

Passcode: 118025

Funding for Foreign Language Study!
Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) awards
http://flas.wisc.edu

Students are invited to join any of our upcoming online information sessions to learn more about Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) awards for the study of critical and less commonly taught languages at UW-Madison.

FLAS fellowships are funded by the U.S. Department of Education and administered by the UW's area & international studies centers to assist students in acquiring foreign language proficiency.

Summer awards offer up to $7,500 in tuition and stipend support for both undergraduate and graduate students; academic awards offer up to $15,000/year in tuition & stipend funding for undergrads and $15k stipend + full tuition for graduate students!

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the United States. The application deadline is February 15, 2021.

For a full list of languages supported by FLAS, further details on eligibility, an FAQs page, and the online application please visit:

http://flas.wisc.edu - the application itself will open shortly


Details on the information sessions can be found @ https://iris.wisc.edu/flas-info-sessions-2021/; all sessions will be streamed day-of @ https://go.wisc.edu/FLASInfoSession

Complete information on FLAS awards, eligibility, information sessions, and the application itself is available online at: http://flas.wisc.edu
Spring 2021 Courses

Asian Languages and Cultures (ASIAN)

  • 100 Gateway to Asia Special Topics: Passion & Enlightenment (H,E) D'Etcheverry (open)

    Instructor Description: I'm so excited to be teaching this course, for the first time! Since it's new, I don't have a syllabus to post in advance. However, the booklist is now posted, and I've added some key words below. Here's a relevant detail: lots of Asian texts (including film) tie passion or its suppression to spiritual insight. One of the first translations of Romeo and Juliet into Japanese even claimed that the lovers sowed the seeds of enlightenment for their families! On the other hand, passion is also commonly seen, across the region, as a source of destruction and chaos. We'll read a use a bunch of great books and films and related scholarship to come up with our own view of the matter--and to learn a lot about Asia, across time, in the process!

  • 104 Intro-E Asian History: Japan (H or Z, E) Murthy (waitlist)

  • 236 Asia Enchanted (Com B, H, E) Jones (waitlist)

  • 246 SE Asian Refugees of Cold War (Ethnic Studies, H or Z, E) Cullinane (full)

  • 255 Intro East Asian Civilizations (H or Z, E) Detwyler (full)

  • 268 Tibetan Cultures & Traditions (H, E) Khedup (open)

    Course Description: Introduction to a wide variety of ancient Tibetan cultural beliefs, practices and motifs that are practiced to this day. Examines topics such as: gender roles and stereotypes in Tibetan society; folk beliefs and practices; astrology, divination, dream interpretation and related issues; art, music and theater; traditional Tibetan medicine and healing practices; and finally, the varied and extensive religious traditions of Tibet in their cultural manifestations. Examines central themes and inquires into the ways it contributes to-or contests-a cultural universe that has direct impact on Tibetan lives.

  • 300 Topics in Asian Studies: Food Ways of Asia (Sophomore standing, H, I) Huntington (open)

    Instructor Description: This course exams the foodways and food cultures of East, Southeast, and Southeast Asia from an interdisciplinary perspective. What can food tell us about individuals, communities, and the cultural flows between them? What can the case of food show us about the different ways history, religious studies, anthropology, and literary studies make sense of the human world? No prior study of Asian languages or cultures is required; all readings are in English, although students with Asian language abilities are encouraged to make use of them.

  • 301 Social Studies Topics in EAS: Contemporary Korea (Sophomore standing, Z, I) Oh (full)

  • 306 Hinduism (Sophomore standing, H or Z, I) Cerulli (open)

    Instructor Description: This is an historical survey of Hinduism, its scriptures, rituals, philosophies, and ethics from ancient times to the contemporary era. Concepts like "karma," "yoga," and "samsara" will be put in the broader contexts of Hindu theism, worship, and law. Our weekly meetings will involve close studies of Hindu literature, films, and modern fiction.

  • 308 Introduction to Buddhism (Sophomore standing, H or Z, I) Hansen (waitlist)

  • 310 Intro to Comics and Graphic Novels (Sophomore standing, H, I) Kern (open)

    Instructor Description: This course, titled "Intro to Comics & Graphic Novels" -- in spite of its catalogue number, "Asian 310" -- covers world comics and graphic novels, not "just" Asian ones. No knowledge of Asia or an Asian language is required. The course counts toward the Humanities breadth requirement, Intermediate level. Sophomore standing or higher required. The course has no required textbooks and no midterm or final exams. The course explores the theory and history, plus some exciting examples (albeit neither exhaustive nor representative), both of media related to comics displaying a comics-like quality termed "comicity," as well as comics itself broadly defined from around the world: bande dessinee, cartoon or comic strips, chronography, collage, comicbooks, concrete or visual poetry, diagrams, editorial or political cartoons, educomics, fumetti, gag cartoons, graphic medicine, graphic narrative, graphic novels, illuminated manuscripts, illustrated board games, illustrated children's books, infographics, kusaz shi, manga, montage, Paleolithic cave paintings, picture books, photo essays, photo-roman, rebuses, schematics, underground comix, web comics, etc. Our overarching goal is to develop a deeper understanding of comics as a major mode of human communication that, while recently enjoying newfound critical attention (as evidenced by the emerging field of Comics Studies) as well as popularity in the US (particularly in relation to Hollywood movies) and beyond, has nevertheless been known in one form or another to most civilizations around the world throughout recorded time. Accordingly, space and time will be taken into consideration in at least two ways: first, through a comparative approach, looking at texts from different cultures (in English translation) and historical epochs; and second, by interrogating the prevailing definition of comics as a visual medium based on the Euroamerican sequential narrative, or cartoon strip, particularly as it relates to filmic conventions, storyboards, and the cinematic spool. In particular, we will situate visuality itself in terms of the sensorium (the relationship of the various senses to each other), pursuing the visual aspect of comics in relation to such things as oral texts, sound, and the embodied perception of time and space.

    Format: SPRING 2021: ASYNCHRONOUS online using video-recorded lectures, with synchronous office hours. Typically, Tuesday lectures are devoted to providing context, Thursdays, to the reading of an assigned graphic novel or comics.

  • 341 Hist-Modern China,1800-1949 (Sophomore standing, H or Z, I) Kinzley (waitlisted)

  • 358 Language in Japanese Society (ASIALANG 104, H, I) Mori (open)

    Instructor Description: This course aims to enhance students' knowledge of and sensitivity towards sociocultural factors that contribute to the construction of Japanese everyday interaction, mass media discourse, and popular culture. This process provides an opportunity for students to evaluate critically taken-for-granted beliefs and assumptions about the Japanese language and its users; it also enables students to make informed choices in adopting different styles of language and positioning themselves in Japanese speaking communities. The topics covered in this course include the following: Language, culture, and ideology "Japanese" communication styles Language standardization and modernization Honorifics Dialects Language and gender Intercultural communication Language and identity construction and ascription Translation of sociolinguistic elements English in Japanese society Japanese language in the era of globalization In addition to discussing book chapters and articles written in English on these subject matters, we will consider actual examples of language use drawn from documentaries, films, interviews, TV programs, or everyday conversations. Although the class focuses on the Japanese language and society, many of the fundamental issues covered in the course can be seen in other languages and communities. When deemed appropriate, students are encouraged to consider how comparable issues are managed in language communities that they are familiar with. (Meet with ASIAN 775)

  • 428 Visual Cultures of India (Sophomore standing, H, I) Chopra (open)

    Instructor Description: This lecture course concentrates on the images (art, advertisements, photography, television, and cinema), material culture (such as, clothing), and environments (architecture, urban planning, and public rituals) of India. During the semester, we will examine Indian visual cultures from the ancient to the modern periods. This historical trajectory will be complemented by a critical focus on selected thematic issues. During these moments we will compare and contrast cases studies from across India, spatially and temporally. These historical ruptures, or time travels, will allow us to see the continuities and discontinuities between the past and present. Thematic issues and ideas that will be examined in this class include sexuality, the representation of women, patronage, cultural encounter and cultural synthesis, iconoclasm, the relationship between landscape and architecture, rethinking the canon, ways of seeing, art and craft, the sacred and secular, colonialism, modernism, nationalism, and the pleasures of Indian cinema. No prior knowledge of India is necessary.
     
  • 430 Indian Traditions in the Modern Age (Sophomore standing, H, I) Buhnemann (open)

    Course Description: Explores how ancient Indian traditions have been reframed for the modern age. Topics include the Ramayama in popular media, negotiations over sacred spaces, and popular Tantra. We will also examine recent controversies, such as the one surrounding the ancient Jain practice of fasting until death (sallekhana) in the modern age. 
  • 431 Chinese Linguistics I (ASIALANG 202, H, I) H. Zhang (open)

    Course Description: Provides an overview of the Chinese language from historical and contemporary perspectives. It will focus on phonetics and phonology (the sound system), dialectology, and orthography (the writing system). The mastery of the knowledge learned in this course is essential for further study in Chinese linguistics. Since the study of Chinese linguistics is often abstract and counterintuitive, you can expect to sharpen your critical and analytical thinking skills throughout this course.

  • 433 Topics-E Asian Visual Cultures: The Two Koreas (Sophomore standing, H, I) H. Kim (full)

  • 458 Hist SE Asia Since 1800 (Junior Standing, Z, I) A. McCoy (open)

    Instructor Description: This course--which is taught in "Hybrid" format (both in-peron and on-line)--explores the modern history of Southeast Asia, a region remarkable for rich cultures and deep conflicts that have shaped the modern world order. Instead of narratives for individual nations, the course analyzes major changes across the whole of Southeast Asia throughout the modern period including, the conquest of traditional kingdoms, rise of European empires, U.S. colonialism, the impact of World War II, national revolutions, the emergence of new nations, and the struggle between democracy and dictatorship. Lectures will explore global themes with case studies of individual countries--including Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, Burma, and the Philippines. As the most intensely colonized region in the world, Southeast Asia offers an ideal arena for exploring the transformative impact of U.S. and European empires upon indigenous societies worldwide. Such study will reveal imperialism as a Promethean fire that shaped the modern world, producing both independent nations and an interdependent global economy. Starting in the era of high imperialism and moving to the present, the course will explore some fundamental historical questions, including: --How did the U.S., British, Dutch, and French empires make Southeast Asia the world's most thoroughly colonized region? --What impact did Japan's conquest have on Southeast Asia during World War II? --How did Indonesians, Vietnamese, and Filipinos react to this colonial subjugation through nationalist resistance to European empires? --Why Southeast Asia experience communist revolutions in Malaya, Philippines, and Vietnam? --What role did the U.S. play in the slaughter of the Indonesian Communist Party and the mass murder of over a one million Indonesians in 1965-66? --Why did newly independent democracies give way so quickly to brutal dictatorships in Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines? --How did mass "People Power revolutions overthrow these dictators, and launch Southeast Asia and much of the world on a path toward democracy? With all the world's major religions, an extraordinary ethnic diversity, a past with both ancient empires and colonial conquest, and a present of war and revolution, democracy and dictatorship, Southeast Asia has inspired a fascinating literature by famous scholars whose sum is nothing less than an inquiry into the making of the modern world.

  • 460 The History of Yoga (Sophomore standing, I, LAS) Buhnemann (full)

  • 563 Readings in Modern Japanese Literature: Japanese Capstone: Translation (Instructor permission, L, A) Kern (open)

    Instructor Description: This course focuses on a wide variety of writings on translation theory paired with the hands-on practice of translating Japanese to English. Knowledge of Japanese is required. Undergraduate students majoring in Japanese should take this course as A563. MA and PhD students should take it as A763. For enrollment codes, contact the ALC student advisor, Ms. Rachel Weiss <rweiss@wisc.edu>.

  • 630 Proseminar: Cultures of Asia: Women Make Movies (Junior standing, H, A) H. Kim (open)

    Instructor Description: This course examines the work of female directors, concentrating on the work of filmmakers from East Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. Throughout the semester, we will address the following questions: What, if anything, unites the work of women directors? Are there particular stylistic or narrative strategies that characterize films directed by women? How does an investigation of women directors change our conception of film history? How does feminist theory film help us to interpret films made by women? What challenges do particular directors pose to critics? How do historical, cultural, and industrial factors shape the work of women directors? As we explore these questions, we will discuss films made both within and outside the mainstream film industry. We will also hone our critical skills by analyzing how directors structure their films' narrative and visual styles.

  • 642 History of Chinese Lit II (ASIAN 351 or 352, A, LAS) Detwyler (open)

    Course Description: Covers the history of Chinese-language literature from the late imperial period though today. The primary focus will be on prose fiction, with additional coverage of the development of major forms such as spoken drama, free-verse poetry, and modern criticism. In exploring these genres and forms, special attention given to issues of language, representation, and politics. The majority of readings will be in Chinese.
     
  • 763 Studies in Japanese Literature (Graduate) Kern (open)

    Instructor Description:
     This course focuses on a wide variety of writings on translation theory paired with the hands-on practice of translating Japanese to English. Knowledge of Japanese is required. Undergraduate students majoring in Japanese should take this course as A563. MA and PhD students should take it as A763. For enrollment codes, contact the ALC student advisor, Ms. Rachel Weiss <rweiss@wisc.edu>.
     
  • 775 Japanese Applied Linguistics (Graduate ) (001) Geyer, (002) Mori (open)

    Course Description:
     One of the general fields such as theater, fiction, etc., studied intensively. 
     
  • 833 Topics in East Asian Visual Cultures: The Two Koreas (Graduate) H. Kim (full)

Asian Languages and Cultures: Language (ASIALANG)

  • 102 Second Semester Chinese - T. Zhang (open)
    202 Fourth Semester Chinese - TBC (open)
    302 Sixth Semester Chinese - H. Zhang (open)

  • 104 Second Semester Japanese - Nakakubo (open)
    204 Fourth Semester Japanese - Geyer (open)

  • 106 Second Semester Korean- Ahn (open)
    206 Fourth Semester Korean 
    - Lim (open)
    306 Sixth 
    Semester Korean - Ahn (open)
    406 Eighth Semester Korean - Lim (open)

  • 110 Elementary Chinese I - TBC (open)

  • 113 First Semester Elementary Japanese - TBC (waitlisted)

  • 124 Second Semester Filipino - Zamar (open)
    224 Fourth Semester Filipino - Zamar (open)

  • 126 Second Semester Hmong - Lee (open)
    226 Fourth Semester Hmong - Lee (open)
    326 Sixth Semester Hmong - Lee (open)

  • 128 Second Semester Indonesian - Suryani (open)
    228 Fourth Semester Indonesian 
    - Suryani (open)
    328 Sixth Semester Indonesian - Barnard (open)

  • 130 Second Semester Thai - Surasin (open)
    230 Fourth Semester Thai - Surasin (open)
    330 Sixth Semester Thai - Surasin (open)

  • 132 Second Semester Vietnamese - Dinh (open)
    232 Fourth
    Semester Vietnamese - Tran (open)
    332 Sixth Semester Vietnamese - Dinh (open)

  • 134 Second Semester Hindi - Chowdhary (open)
    234 Fourth Semester Hindi - Chowdhary (open)
    334 Sixth Semester Hindi - Chowdhary (open)

  • 136 Second Semester Modern Tibetan - Khedup (open)
    236 Fourth Semester Modern Tibetan - Khedup (open)
    336 Sixth Semester Modern Tibetan - Khedup (open)

  • 138 Second Semester Persian - Mirsharifi (open)
    238 Fourth Semester Persian - Mirsharifi (open)
    338 Sixth Semester Persian - Mirsharifi (open)

  • 140 Second Semester Urdu - Asif (open)
    240 Fourth Semester Urdu - Asif (open)
    340 Sixth Semester Urdu - Asif (open)

  • 142 Second Semester Sanskrit - Jones (open)

  • 212 Heritage Chinese II - TBC (open)

  • 313 Classical Japanese - D'Etcheverry (open)

    Instructor Description: Hi! I'm so glad that you're considering taking classical Japanese! It's one of my favorite classes to teach, and it can help you to read both ancient works and pre-war texts (not all that old in the grand scheme of things). We will also start learning to read cursive script, the kind that you see on woodblock prints. I'll update this description by December 6. In the meantime, if you want to see an old syllabus, just ask!

  • 377 Business Japanese Communication - Nakakubo (full)

  • 379 Business Chinese - TBC (full)

  • 452 Advanced Japanese: AV Media - Mori (full)

  • 454 Advanced Chinese through Media - T. Zhang (waitlist)

  • 475 Advanced Topics in Asian Translation: Traditional Chinese Fiction - Huntington (open)

    Instructor Description: This is a study of the challenges and rewards of translating pre-twentieth century Chinese xiaoshuo (fiction, although the translation xiaoshuo=fiction or novel is one question we will discuss.) The course will be divided between discussion of theories and histories of translation, and work on individual and shared translation projects. The nineteenth novel Jing hua yuan (Flowers in the Mirror) will be a central case throughout the semester.

ASIAN/E A STDS/HIS 104: Introduction to Japanese History course video! Watch here!
ASIAN 310: Introduction to Comics and Graphic Novels: Theory, History, Method course video. Watch here!
ASIALANG 106/206/306/406: Korean language program course offerings video. Watch here!
This is an historical survey of Hinduism, it's scriptures, rituals, philosophies, and ethics from ancient times to the contemporary era. Concepts like "karma," "yoga," and "samsara" will be put in the broader contexts of Hindu theism, worship, and law. Our weekly meetings will involve close studies of Hindu literature, films, and modern fiction.
This course introduces students to the history and aesthetics of Japanese art from some of the world's earliest pottery to examples of the anime-inspired art of today. It explores the forms, contexts, and meanings of works of painting, sculpture, architecture, ceramics, prints, and other selected media. It looks at the social, religious, and other functions of art works in various social and aesthetic environments, including early tombs, the ancient imperial court, early medieval Zen monasteries, tea ceremony circles, the floating world of visual and erotic pleasure found in early modern cities, and the global spaces of contemporary art. Class participation is encouraged and rewarded.

Professor Phillips will be retiring after this spring, so this is his final course offering Arts of Japan.

This course may count for ALC majors humanities requirement, Japanese major intermediate electives, and Japanese certificate humanities electives.
Instructor Description: In this course, we take an in-depth look at Japanese woodblock prints, primarily of the Edo Period (1600-1868). The two foci are (1) gaining an understanding of how the prints arise out of and play roles in larger social and cultural milieus and (2) being able to analyze and draw evidence from both visual and textual evidence. In addition to lectures and discussion sessions, there will be examinations of high-resolution images of prints in the collection of the Chazen Museum of Art. Please note that some of the works we will study and discuss are erotic and/or violent.

Professor Phillips will be retiring after this spring, so this is his final course offering Ukiyo-E.

This course may count for ALC majors humanities requirement, Japanese major intermediate electives, and Japanese certificate humanities electives.
This lecture course concentrates on the images (art, advertisements, photography, television, and cinema), material culture (such as, clothing), and environments (architecture, urban planning, and public rituals) of India.

During the semester, we will examine Indian visual cultures from the ancient to the modern periods. This historical trajectory will be complemented by a critical focus on selected thematic issues. During these moments we will compare and contrast cases studies from across India, spatially and temporally. These historical ruptures, or time travels, will allow us to see the continuities and discontinuities between the past and present. Thematic issues and ideas that will be examined in this class include sexuality, the representation of women, patronage, cultural encounter and cultural synthesis, iconoclasm, the relationship between landscape and architecture, rethinking the canon, ways of seeing, art and craft, the sacred and secular, colonialism, modernism, nationalism, and the pleasures of Indian cinema. No prior knowledge of India is necessary.

Anthropology 357: Anthropology of Japan, Tues & Thurs 2:30-3:45PM, remote synchronous:

The course introduces Japanese history, society, and culture from anthropological perspectives. Japan or the Japanese will NOT be treated as hermetically sealed, but will emphasize how Japanese culture and society have undergone changes in the tidal waves of transnational historic flows. While examining the collective identity and its symbolic expressions – “we, the Japanese” – this notion will be questioned by examining the heterogeneity of the population, including minorities. Other topics covered are: emperor and the imperial system; language in its social contexts; educational systems; religions; gift exchange; illness and medical systems; “nature” and environment; Japan’s militarism & World War II. You can view a course promotion here.

This course may count for ALC majors humanities requirement, Japanese major intermediate electives, and Japanese certificate humanities electives.

Professor Preeti Chopra’s introductory AH 103 "Passage Through India: South Asia’s Global Architectural Histories" is giving us some serious #thecrown 
vibes. Whether you’re a fan of The Crown or not, Prof. Chopra’s course has no prereqs and no prior knowledge of India (or Princess Diana) is needed. Her course will be offered MW 1:20–2:10pm. 
Events
2021 Asian Studies Student Symposium
Wednesday, April 14, 2021, 5-6:30 pm
via Zoom

We welcome advanced undergraduate students in the Asian Languages & Cultures, Chinese or Japanese major; Chinese or Japanese Professional Communication certificate programs; and dedicated students in our Asian language courses to share their experiences in our virtual showcase! Talk to your faculty, instructor, or advisors in ALC about what YOU could do to exhibit and show off your skills and knowledge in our ALC annual spring event!

Deadline to participate: March 5th by email to rweiss@wisc.edu.

IIP will have virtual events this spring! Attend to learn more about virtual and in-person internship opportunities.

Intern Abroad!
Wednesday Feb. 3, 12:00 - 1:00pm
Monday Feb. 8, 5:00 - 6:00pm

Internships in Communications
Thursday Feb. 5, 5:30 - 6:30pm

Engineering Career Fair
Tuesday Feb. 9, 2:00 - 7:00pm

Intern & Teach Abroad
Part of the Public Service Fair
Monday Feb. 15, 4:30 - 5:00pm

Visit the Events page for more information.

Management & Tech Consulting Experience with Credera: Using Design Thinking for a Client

Thursday, January 21 / 2:00pm – 5:00pm CST

In this experience, you'll work in teams with other students and a leader from Credera, a full-service management consulting, user experience, and technology solutions firm, to learn about design thinking and complete a Design Sprint – a method for solving complex problems. You’ll also learn from Credera leaders (including the Chief Innovation Officer and leader of User Experience Practice) about how Credera uses Design Sprints to solve their clients’ toughest challenges. RSVP on Handshake

Spring 2021 Virtual Career Fairs for all majors are just around the corner, taking place February 10 – 25. There are many great opportunities for students to meet online with employers to find full-time jobs and internships in a variety of interest areas and roles, or to ask questions and learn more about employers and career options.

These fairs will again be held on the Handshake virtual fairs platform, so students will need to activate their Handshake accounts to participate.

Students, faculty/staff, and employers can learn more about the Spring 2021 Virtual Career Fairs at https://careerfair.wisc.edu/upcoming-fairs/

Here are a few important notes regarding these upcoming fairs:

  • Open to ALL enrolled UW-Madison students, plus recent alumni who graduated within the past two years
  • Students can sign up to meet with employers in group or 1:1 sessions
  • Students must register for fairs on Handshake to view available sessions (check each fair for registration dates)
  • Resources to help students prepare for the fairs, including Mock Career Fair events, are available here

A full listing of virtual fairs on Handshake can be viewed here.

Internships & Opportunities
Virtual International Internships
Spring and Summer 2021

Develop your language skills and build up your resume while earning course credit (fall, spring and summer positions).

Some paid opportunities and many scholarships available!

Sustainability Internships

The Office of Sustainability Internship is a year-long program in which student teams work to raise awareness of sustainable practices, influence consumer behavior, and train partners across campus in individualized strategies for implementation. Interns work closely with campus offices, departments, and auxiliary units like University Housing or the Wisconsin Union. Students can expect to gain concrete knowledge of sustainability solutions as well as professional development training in an upbeat, collaborative environment. The student intern program is open to any undergraduate who is passionate about sustainability, regardless of major.

For more information about our Office of Sustainability, please visit https://sustainability.wisc.edu/. Questions regarding the student intern program should be directed to Jason Gallup at jgallup@wisc.edu.

Applications are due by midnight on Sunday, February 7th, 2021, and interviews will be set up for selected candidates during the first two weeks in March.
Graduate Student News

 Professional Development for Graduate Students January 2021  

Winter Professional Development Challenge 

January 1–31, 2021 (Online) 

Complete at least five activities in January to earn a limited-edition long sleeve t-shirt while investing in yourself at the same time! Professional development activities on a variety of topics are listed on the Winter Professional Development Challenge webpage.  

Register now to receive weekly emails: https://go.wisc.edu/8a0nmi 

Graduate Student Interest Groups 

Starting January 11, the Office of Professional Development will be offering opportunities for students to meet other graduate students and share their interest in a particular topic, or just have time to work together.  

Please register using the links below to receive reminders and more information about group meetings

Work-Life Integration and Priority Management 4:00 PM (30-minute meetings, Online), Monday every other week, starting Jan. 11 

Prelim Preparation 4:00 PM (30-minute meetings, Online), Tuesday every other week, starting Jan. 12 

Job Market Preparation 4:00 PM (30-minute meetings, Online), Wednesday every other week, starting Jan. 13 

Virtual Coworking Space (Virtual Coffee Shop) 4:00 PM (1-hour meetings, Online), Thursday every week, starting Jan. 14 

A Practical Approach to Project Management for Graduate Students 

Thursday, January 21, 9:00 AM–2:00 PM CST (Online) 

Project management is a set of skills that can be applied in academic, non-profit, laboratory, business, and many other settings. Learn principles of project management and apply them to your own project in this collaborative, virtual program. Workshop includes a panel of successful project managers.  

Register here: https://go.wisc.edu/09538d 

Understanding and Overcoming Procrastination 

Thursday, January 28, 5:30–6:30 PM CST (Online) 

The goal for this workshop for graduate students, presented by James Gresh, M.S., UHS, will be to better understand why we procrastinate and to explore strategies to overcome our procrastination tendencies.  

Register here: https://go.wisc.edu/xzns9h

Successful Online Learning 

Asynchronous/On-Demand (Online) 

Explore strategies to prepare to learn remotely, engage in your courses, and maximize your time. This module is for grad students taking their first online courses or those looking for some new resources on online learning. Enroll in the Successful Online Learning Canvas course at any time: https://canvas.wisc.edu/courses/223367 

COMING IN EARLY FEBRUARY: 

Why Capable Students Suffer from Impostor Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It  

Tuesday, February 2, 11:00 AM–1:00 PM CST (Online) 

Millions of people around the world—from executives to graduate students and their professors to Academy Award winners—secretly worry they’re not as bright and capable as other people “think” they are. Join us for an interactive presentation led by speaker and author Dr. Valerie Young. 

Register here: https://go.wisc.edu/b9q87b 

3MT® Finals
Wednesday, February 3, 6:00–7:00 PM CST (Online)
Three Minute Thesis® or 3MT® is an international competition in which graduate students explain their research to a general audience in three minutes or less. Over 60 UW–Madison graduate students registered to compete in the first virtual 3MT® competition, with 39 advancing to the semifinals. Our panel of research communication experts reviewed the videos and selected the top 9 competitors to advance to the 3MT® Finals where they will compete for cash prizes and a chance to represent UW–Madison at the Midwest Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) regional 3MT® competition. Join us to watch the finalist presentations, hear from the competitors, vote on the People's Choice award, and see the winners announced! Register to receive a link and reminder email before the competition: https://go.wisc.edu/tvxnx0 

Please see the Graduate School Events Calendar for a campus-wide list of professional development events for graduate students: http://grad.wisc.edu/pd/events/.   

Scholarships

Interested in learning a South Asian Language this Summer, but need funding to do so? 

Look no further than SASLI 2021! SASLI, based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is an eight-week intensive summer language program, offering courses in the following languages: Bengali, Dari, Gujarati, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Pashto, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sinhala, Tamil, Tibetan, and Urdu.

*Malayalam, Telugu, and Kannada will be offered by the University of Texas at Austin for the 2021 program*

SASLI will offer Third-Year Hindi, Third-Year Urdu, and new this year, Third-Year Sanskrit in addition to the Elementary and Intermediate level courses offered in the other languages. 

Program Dates: June 14 - August 6
Application Deadline: April 1, 2021
Apply Online: https://sasli.wisc.edu/student-application/

For the 2021 Program, SASLI is proud to offer several funding opportunities to eligible applicants covering partial to full tuition costs.   

These opportunities include: 

  • $1000 Fee Remission
    • Does not require a second application; indicate interest when submitting the SASLI online application. 
    • Brings the SASLI tuition to $3,800 (any additional fees through the University, for textbooks, or personal use are not covered). 
    • The application deadline is April 1, 2021.
  • 2. SASLI Half and Full Fee Remission
    • Requires a separate application submitted through an online portal. The application includes the online application form, a statement of purpose, a statement of financial need, and two letters of recommendation. 
    • The Half Scholarship covers $2,400 of SASLI tuition. The Full Scholarship covers the full $4,800 of SASLI tuition (any additional fees through the University, for textbooks, or personal use are not covered). 
    • The application deadline has not been determined. The application will open soon.
  • 3. SASLI FLAS Fellowships 
    • Requires a separate application submitted through an online portal. The application typically includes the online application form, a statement/essay, transcripts, resume, and two letters of recommendation. 
    • FLAS Fellowships cover full tuition plus a $2,500 stipend (any additional fees through the University, for textbooks, or personal use may not be covered). 
    • The deadline to apply is February 15, 2021. The application will open soon. 
       
  • 4. WISLI Tuition Scholarship 
    • Requires a separate application submitted through an online portal. The application includes the online application form, a statement of purpose, and two letters of recommendation. 
    • The WISLI Tuition Scholarship covers full tuition (any additional fees through the University, for textbooks, or personal use may not be covered).
    • The deadline to apply is March 15, 2021. You can access the application here: https://wisli.wisc.edu/wisli-tuition-scholarship/.

Though some of these awards require a separate application, we encourage students to apply to both these awards and the SASLI general application with the same statement of purpose and transcripts. Doing the additional work of writing a separate statement for your scholarship awards is not necessary nor expected. 

More information on these awards, how to apply, who is eligible, and more, can be found here: https://sasli.wisc.edu/overview/

Please direct any questions to sasli@southasia.wisc.edu.

The RRW Phoenix Rising Humanitarian Scholarship is open for application to College of Letters & Science students beyond their first year who will be enrolled in the fall 2021 with a strong record of community service and humanitarian activism. Successful applicants possess a compassionate for human welfare, engage in action towards improving the human condition and demonstrate the innate qualities of dignity, courage and discipline. Application finalists are invited to virtual interviews with the scholarship committee members in late February 2021. Awardees are announced in March 2021. Award ranges from $2500-$5000 and is provided for the 2021-2022 academic year. Applications are due January 20, 2021. 

This scholarship is made available by the generosity of Charles Manthey Winter and the Richard Ralph Winter Rising Phoenix Humanitarian Scholarship.

Students can visit the Students can visit the Wisconsin Scholarship Hub (WiSH) for application information.  

The applications for 2020-2021 College of Letters & Science Continuing Students Scholarships are currently open for application. There are two L&S continuing student applications – one for currently enrolled First Year Students who enrolled fall/summer 2020 and another for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors (who will be enrolled fall 2021).

The application due date is Monday, February 15, 2021.

Students can visit the Wisconsin Scholarship Hub (WiSH) for application information.  

Virtual Student Informational Sessions for important information about this opportunity – and other L&S scholarship opportunities will be held on Thursday, February 4, 2021, 5:00-6:00 PM

Content provided in the sessions includes: using WiSH (Wisconsin Scholarship Hub), scholarship opportunities, eligibilities and L&S criteria, tips for success, questions & answers and timeline(s).

Additional information about College of Letters & Science Scholarships is available at: https://scholarships.ls.wisc.edu/. For questions about the application and award process, please email scholarships@saa.ls.wisc.edu. Note: Student financial aid packages can be impacted by scholarship awards. Students are recommended to contact the financial aid office to learn about potential impact on current aid packages at https://financialaid.wisc.edu/.

Job Posting
American Councils for International Education is hiring short-term Resident Directors for summer language immersion programs abroad for American high school and college students studying one of 15 critical languages including: Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bangla, Chinese, Hindi, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Punjabi, Russian, Swahili, Turkish, and Urdu. 
 
Resident Directors must be proficient in the target language and typically have experience studying, working, or traveling in the host country. They are responsible for promoting student success by ensuring the health and safety of program participants, helping them to maintain a language policy, and assisting them in acclimating to life in the host country. In-country partner institutes are responsible for administering the academic curriculum. Therefore, the Resident Director position is a non-teaching position. 
 
A full list of available Resident Director positions is available at https://www.americancouncils.org/careers

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until positions are filled. 
Advising Available
Apply to Graduate
The “apply for graduation” action notifies your school/college that you plan to complete your degree requirements in a specific term. This allows the staff of your school/college to begin evaluating your degree accomplishments in preparation for graduation.

Note:
  • You will be able to apply for graduation in a term any time before the degree conferral date, at which point a term will be removed from the options. Contact your academic dean's office if you have missed the deadline.
  • If you want your name in the commencement program, you need to apply for graduation before the deadline announced by the Chancellor’s Office.
  • Graduate students who apply will still need to contact their major program to request a degree warrant from the Graduate School on their behalf.
  • Graduate students may review all degree dates and deadlines here.
  • You may change your graduation term/commencement date after initially applying, but keep note of the deadlines mentioned above. Click here for more information.
  • More information about what is visible on your diploma can be reviewed here.
To send items for the next ALC e-news please email:
Rachel Weiss 
Undergraduate Advisor and Graduate Program Coordinator
Department of Asian Languages & Cultures
(608) 890-0138      E-mail: rweiss@wisc.edu
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Dept. Asian Languages and Cultures, UW-Madison · 1220 Linden Dr · 1244 Van Hise Hall · Madison, WI 53706-1525 · USA

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