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CONTENTS
SUPPORTERS
  • TOWNSHIP - Community information with local interest
  • NEIGHBORS - The stories and goings on in McNary Estates neighborhood
  • IN THE KITCHEN - News about local Restaurants, Home Cooking and more
  • HUMOR ME - A lighter side of life perspective
  • ON THE GREENS - McNary Golf Club is the central hub of activities on the course and beyond 
  • MCNARY NEWS - A personal reflection 

The McNary Newsletter is paid for and distributed by Tom's Professional Services within the community, however McNary Estates HOA does not contribute financially to the newsletter. Contributing writers: Mark Percy, Tom Dieker, Christine Dieker, and Bob Balmer. Contributing Photographers: Susan May

PUBLICATION INFORMATION
TOM DIEKER - ADVERTISING 503-949-O891 / tomdieker@comcast.net
CHRISTINE DIEKER - EDITORIAL 503-949-6099 / diekerchristine@gmail.com
GLORIA JONES - DISTRIBUTION 503-949-3480

AD SPONSORS
The Swancutt, Perkins & Cygrymus Group, Glen Creek Dental, Unchained Construction, Jeff & Sheryl's, Gysin Realty Group-Shaughn Tupper, John's Waterproofing Company, Moving Made Easy, Roth's Fresh Market, HomeSmart Realty Group-Troy Renshaw, Thomas Painting, Rick & Ande Hoffman-HomeSmart,Valley Roofing, Willamette Lutheran Retirement Community, Boucher Jewelers, Gloria’s House Cleaning, Tom Hempel Testing, R Bauer Insurance Inc, and Budget Blinds
TOWNSHIP
OHA provides tips for a safe (but still spooky and fun) Halloween

The COVID-19 pandemic is reshaping how Oregonians celebrate holidays, and that includes Halloween. But it doesn’t mean Halloween this year can’t still be spooky and fun!

People in Oregon are creative, they care about their community and they know it’s important to celebrate safely. This year, it’s more important than ever to put safety first because COVID-19 cases have risen recently and holiday gatherings on Memorial Day, July 4th and Labor Day led to increased case counts. So, this Halloween, be extra mindful of your choices. Choosing low risk Halloween plans can help to prevent the spread of COVID-19 illness, decrease the impact on Oregon’s health care system and save lives.

This Halloween, the Oregon Health Authority is recommending that Oregonians avoid traditional door-to-door trick or treating and “Trunk or Treat” events because these are high risk activities for crowding among people outside your household. This recommendation aligns with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), which also recommends families avoid traditional trick or treating.

Some ideas for safer, low-risk activities include holding an online costume contest, watching a scary movie online, carving pumpkins with people in your household, decorating your house or apartment, or touring the neighborhood to look at decorated houses with members of your household.

“If you dress up in a costume, be careful to plan a costume that allows you to wear a face covering,” said State Health Officer Dr. Dean Sidelinger. “Halloween masks will not protect you or others from coronavirus. Wearing a cloth or disposable face mask that fits snugly and covers your mouth and nose is still required while wearing a costume, no matter how scary or silly your costume is.”

For more tips to stay safe this holiday, check out these infographics about Halloween activities and how to safely visit a pumpkin patch or farm, and then share them with your friends and family on your Facebook and Instagram accounts.

NEIGHBORS
Now You Know ..... Stan & Nancy Turner
By Tom Dieker
I have had the pleasure to know Stan and Nancy Turner for over thirty years. They are just quality people in the highest form. How special it was to welcome them to McNary Estates as home owners and to be able to wave hello from the third fairway. Stan worked with me at the Keizer Roth's Fresh Market. He was the produce manager and part of my team that assured quality service and products.  Nancy worked in the medical field starting as a nurse and then continued to move up the ladder to a management positions. Now that they are both retired, they enjoy increasing their time together and playing more golf. Stan, in retirement, is also enjoying being a mobile Notary Public.

Stan and Nancy have supported my annual Dieker Golf Party for over twenty years. As sponsors and participants, they embraced the cause and concept of having a "party within the party" while playing with family and friends. Parents of two great young men, Chris and Andy Turner who were McNary High School graduates. Stan and Nancy are soon to be proud grandparents. What special times are in store for them!
Stan and Nancy Turner
YOUR HEALTH
Preventive Steps for Influenza from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Take time to get a flu vaccine.

  • CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses. Getting a flu vaccine during 2020-2021 will be more important than ever.
  • Flu vaccines will not prevent COVID-19, but they will reduce the burden of flu illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths on the health care system and conserve scarce medical resources for the care of people with COVID-19. (Read more about flu vaccine benefits.)
  • CDC estimates that last season, fewer than half of Americans got a flu vaccine and at least 410,000 people were hospitalized from flu. Increased vaccination coverage would reduce that burden.
  • Most flu vaccines protect against the four flu viruses that research suggests will be most common. (See Vaccine Virus Selection for this season’s vaccine composition.)
  • Everyone 6 months of age and older should get annual flu vaccine by the end of October. Learn more about vaccine timing.
  • Vaccination of high risk persons is especially important to decrease their risk of severe flu illness.
  • People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with certain chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older. Many people at higher risk from flu also seem to be at higher risk from COVID-19.
  • Vaccination also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for people at higher risk to keep from spreading flu to them. This is especially true for people who work in long-term care facilities, which are home to many of the people most vulnerable to flu and COVID-19.
  • Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness, but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for infants should be vaccinated instead.

Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.

  • Take everyday preventive actions that are always recommended to reduce the spread of flu.
    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • If you are sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes.
    • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with viruses that cause flu.
  • See Everyday Preventative Actionspdf icon and recommended precautions to take during daily life and when going out for more information about actions – apart from getting vaccinated and taking medicine – that people and communities can take to help slow the spread of illnesses like influenza (flu).
  • For flu, CDC recommends that people stay home for at least 24 hours after their fever is gone except to get medical care or other necessities. Fever should be gone without the need to use a fever-reducing medicine. The stay-at-home guidance for COVID-19 may be different.
  • In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, local governments or public health departments may recommend additional precautions be taken in your community. Follow those instructions.

Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

  • If you are sick with flu, antiviral drugs can be used to treat your illness. Flu antiviral drugs are not designed to treat COVID-19.
  • Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) and are not available over-the-counter.
  • Antiviral drugs can make flu illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complicationsFor people with high risk factors pdf icon[308 KB, 2 Pages], treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having a milder illness versus a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.
  • Studies show that flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within 2 days of getting sick, but starting them later can still be helpful, especially if the sick person has a high risk factor or is very sick from flu.
  • If you are at higher risk from flu and get flu symptoms, call your health care provider early so you can be treated with flu antivirals if needed. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking this drug.

Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people also may have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with flu and have respiratory symptoms without a fever. Visit CDC’s website to find out what to do if you get sick with flu.

HUMOR ME 
By Bob Balmer
“Don’t Leave Home Without It”
I was driving toward Hawthorne Street, eager to get my swimming-pool-size diet Pepsi when I went to take off my mask.   Except there was no mask.   I patted my cheeks.  Checked my ears for straps.  Nothing, yet I felt like I had a mask on.  There the mask was--on the passenger seat.
                How odd, I thought.  It felt as if I were wearing it.
                Is there such a thing as phantom mask syndrome?
                If so, I have it.  I’m constantly trying to take off a mask that doesn’t exist.  Sometimes, I accidentally wear one mask over another mask, as if I just finished reading Nanook of the North, and I over-identify with the Tundra. 
                There are masks everywhere, falling, as if autumn leaves, from a very careless hospital in the sky.  There’s a mask on my desk, one on the kitchen table, two hanging from the coat rack, one on the street corner, two on a tree, one next to my toothbrush, one… on my face. 
                Of course, I’m used to it now.  Masks are a part of me.  And yet they’re not.   Sometimes after the news and before bedtime, I crave a chocolate bar.  Crave, crave, crave.   Something sweet for sweet dreams I tell myself, making sure I look away from the “Diabetes” cookbook on my counter.   Halfway to the store I think: “Where’s my mask?”  I touch my mouth-- okay, saliva.  Not what I wanted.  I pull out my hand sanitizer, squirt my hands and grumble, “Phantom mask syndrome.”  If I were going to the store for something like carrots or lettuce, I’d stay home, but chocolate... I’ll get that mask.
                I look into my car, which is parked in front of my house.  There are three masks on the passenger seat, and I think they’re laughing.  Silent mirthful “don’t forget me” masks, like the date who you accidentally left in the car and laughs about it.
                I open the car door, grab a mask, tug it to snug.  Chocolate in five minutes.  Max.  All is well, or as well as it can be.
ON THE GREENS
Tim Bowman and Mac Martin Repeat as Match Play Champions
By Mark Piercy, Men’s Club Secretary

History repeated itself as the McNary Men’s Golf Club annual summer long Match Play Tourney concluded in late August after launching the first week in June. Tim Bowman and Mac Martin, who won the 2019 edition, returned to the top of the podium in 2020. Thirty-two participants were divided into 2 brackets by handicap and followed a double elimination format. The two brackets of 16 competitors each played a total of 61 matches that whittled the field down to 2 Champions. Tim Bowman came out on top of Bracket 1 with a 5-1 record. He advanced with 4 straight wins over Rob Schuster, Robbie Wood, Rich Demello, and Jim McKenna, to play Don Baer who had worked his way back from the one loss bracket. Baer won their first match “1 up.” Since this was Bowman’s first loss a second match with Baer was necessary. Bowman prevailed the second time “3 and 2” to become Champion. Baer finished second with a 5-2 record. McKenna finished 3rd. John McGregor finished 4th.
 
Bracket 2’s Champion, Mac Martin, made it through the bracket undefeated at 5-0. His victims included Robert Tesch, Jerry Splonski, Ed Bybee, and Tom Nicolai to reach the finals. In the finals he faced Nicolai a second time as Nicolai had advanced from the one loss bracket. In the final Martin beat Nicolai “4 and 3.” Nicolai finished second with a 4-2 record. Splonski finished 3rd.  Bill Link finished 4th. Just like last year, Martin then faced Bowman in a “one and done” showdown on Sunday, September 20, to answer who is the Best of the Best. Unlike last year when Bowman prevailed, Martin answered firmly in the rematch with a “6 and 5” finish in the grand finale to claim overall Top Dog. Winners of each bracket received a payout of $160, with second place-$120, third-$80 and 4th-$40. An additional $50 went to the Top Dog.
 
The next official event for the Men’s Club is the Fall Classic, Saturday, October 17. This is a 2-man pick your own partner, 9 holes of Best Ball and 9 holes of Chapman. The Men’s Club is also participating in the Memorial Tournament Oct 9 and 10. This 2-day, 2-man, Best Ball, event organized by Jeff McDonnell, Greg Pedersen, and Charlie Davidson, is open to current and past members of the Club and pays tribute to Men’s Club members who have died. At least 83 members have passed away since the inception of the Club in 1962. Also, the annual Civil War Tournament will take place most likely in November. This event features an equal number of Beavers squaring off against an equal number of Ducks, usually in a match play format. The teams are Captained by Glen Zielinski and Jeff McDonnell, respectively.
 
The McNary Men’s Golf Club is open to men age 21 and older. All skill levels are welcome as events are handicapped. A handicap (GHIN) must be established with the OGA/USGA. There are 12 annual events on the Men’s Club calendar and members meet 7 days a week for organized play. Applications to join are in the pro shop. Annual dues are $35. There is an optional $5 hole-in-one fund. Men’s Club members do not have to be members of McNary Golf Club, but the Golf Club has a variety of very affordable membership levels and promotions. Contact Director of Golf Operations Chip Sullivan at 503-393-4653 x2 or chip.sullivan@mcnarygolfclub.com for membership information. Otherwise you will have to pay greens and cart fees to play in Men’s Club events or daily play. For more Men’s Club details you can inquire with the professional golf staff or email markapiercy@gmail.com.
The McNary Men’s Golf Club is open to men age 21 and older. All skill levels are welcome as events are handicapped. A handicap (GHIN) must be established with the OGA/USGA. There are 12 annual events on the Men’s Club calendar and members meet 7 days a week for organized play. Applications to join are in the pro shop. Annual dues are $35. There is an optional $5 hole-in-one fund. Men’s Club members do not have to be members of McNary Golf Club, but the Golf Club has a variety of very affordable membership levels and promotions. Contact Director of Golf Operations Chip Sullivan at 503-393-4653 x2 or chip.sullivan@mcnarygolfclub.com for membership information. Otherwise you will have to pay greens and cart fees to play in Men’s Club events or daily play. For more Men’s Club details you can inquire with the professional golf staff or email markapiercy@gmail.com.
MCNARY NEWS
By Christine Dieker
Red sky at night, sailors delight. Red sky at morning sailors take warning. What about that yellow sky here in McNary Estates? What were we as neighbors doing? What was going through our heads as we heard about the tole it was taking on our nearby neighboring communities in the canyon, Scotts Mills, and Silverton area. The devastating wildfires mostly brought on by freak high winds and a dry weather phenonium became another lasting memory of 2020. 

I personally set up a laptop on the dining room table to monitor the the Quality Air Index and the evacuation warnings. As a household family, we didn't take the steps to photograph or video our belongings, however our conversations on where would we go and what would we take, seemed to set a scary reality of the situation. Several friends were dealing with losing property, some were sharing their escape, and others humbly took action by helping evacuees or even being part of a grassroots fire fighting missions.

The over week long eerie (a word that was often used in describing what we saw and felt) world we endured among our Covid-19 precautions and the nearby civil unrest, increased anxiety for sure. Looking out our patio window at the ash covering the deck and furnishings made me sad thinking about a social media post commenting on the ash being from the homes lost.  

We may not in our lifetime, experience another situation like the first ten days of September 2020 in northwestern Oregon. As I began to clean-up patio, I said a prayer for resilience.
 
Copyright © 2020 The McNary Newsletter, All rights reserved.


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