1849 C Street, NW Washington, DC 20240 | Tel: 202-208-4056 

November 14, 2017

NOVEMBER IS TIME TO RECOGNIZE VETERANS AND NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH. IT’S ALSO A TIME TO GIVE THANKS!

We are enjoying the many commemorations this month for Veteran’s Day, National Native American Heritage Month; soon Thanksgiving will be with us, when we can pause to take time with family and friends, enjoy a wonderful meal, and offer thanks for all our bounty. Of course we are also enjoying many new artworks (coming in practically every few days) here at the Shop, for which we are thankful.  We wish you all a wonderful November!

Honoring All Veterans – We hope you enjoyed your Veteran’s Day Events and Activities

CELEBRATE THE ARTS IN RECOGNITION OF NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

 
Through the arts we share cultures, with tangible expressions that enrich people’s lives.

In speaking to some artists, we often hear statements such as “I never really ‘planned’ on becoming/ being a lifetime artist, it just kind of happened.”  For others, we hear “I always knew I wanted to be an artist and feel so fortunate I’ve been able to fulfill my dream.”  What resonates with many of our artists, customers and us is that the arts are a conduit that connect and educate people all along the way. Through the beauty of the arts of Alaska natives for instance, we learn of the culture of the peoples of the far north, of the animal life and subsistence lifestyles. Through the arts of kachina doll carving, we learn of the cultures of the Puebloan peoples, the ceremonial dances, and the importance of the connection to the seasons, nature and animal life. Within the art of each craft area, we learn more of each culture. We learn through designs in the arts, e.g., stepped patterns for clouds, life migration patterns and swirls for the wind, etc. We also learn of the artists, their lives and their stories.
The arts are how we celebrate Native American Heritage and we wish all of you continued life enrichment through the arts!
 
Celebrate the creativity and livelihood of today’s
American Indian artists Celebrate the arts!
 

ROCK YOUR MOCS on NOVEMBER 15, 2017

What started as a one-day event is now a weeklong celebration. Join in and celebrate a time to learn about cultures through footwear, where Native peoples across the world wear their moccasins as a way to recognize tribal individuality and celebrate National Native American Heritage Month. Pull on your own “mocs,” share your culture, and post and share your photos! https://www.facebook.com/RockYourMocs  

HIGHLIGHT ON WHALE BONE CARVINGS BY YUPIK ARTISTS

The arts from Alaska include a great variety of traditional and contemporary works, often reflecting the rich Alaska native cultures. Many of the arts have origins in tradition and function; they are created from materials of a subsistence lifestyle and indigenous to the different areas of Alaska.
Our recent collection of Alaska native arts contains carvings created by Yupik artists from St. Lawrence Island, located in the Bering Sea, west of mainland Alaska. The livelihood for many of these artists is sustained through their finely carved whalebone. They use the natural shape of the bone and transform the material into a variety of expressive figures, such as walrus, seal, polar bear and owl. Their creations often are further enhanced with pieces of inlaid walrus tusk ivory and baleen to simulate the creatures’ eyes and other features. 

Whalebone, from several decades to centuries old, is often gathered during the summer months and provides a dramatic medium for carvings of dancers, large figures and masks. The mineral in the substrate from which the bone is collected determines the color of the material. The porous nature of the bone offers a different tactile sensation from the smooth walrus tusk ivory, but pieces from this medium are no less prized than those of the ivory. Check out a few of our recent arrivals:
Owl - Whale Bone
by Glen Oozevaseuk
(Yupik)

$355
Shop Now
Jamez
Mask - Whale Bone and Polar Bear Fur
by Evans Apatiki (Yupik)

$260
Shop Now
Hopi
Owl - Whale Bone
by Charles Slwooko (Yupik)

$325
Shop Now

NEW ARRIVALS INCLUDE JEWELRY BY MARY AND EVERETT TELLER (NAVAJO)

Lifetime jewelers Mary and Everett Teller create jewelry using overlay techniques, stamping and texturing. We’ve recently selected a wonderful array of bracelets, rings, necklaces and earrings along with jewelry by their son, Travis Teller, who is always experimenting with innovative designs and metal textures.
 New jewelry by Mary and Everett Teller and Travis Teller (Navajo)
As always, check out the new additions section often as we constantly add new items to our web store !

COMING IN DECEMBER!
MARK YOUR CALENDARS NOW!


SHOW ON STONE, SHELL AND MORE WITH A SPECIAL FOCUS ON
TURQUOISE – DECEMBER 15-16, 2017


Artist representative Martin Seidel will be our special guest and will share his knowledge of the stones and other materials used to create today’s jewelry, with a special highlight on turquoise. We will explore examples of raw materials, polished and cut stones and jewelry during informal presentations in the Shop. Bring your questions (and notepads!) for this very informative look at stones and materials used in
contemporary American Indian jewelry.

We will also offer a special highlight on jewelry created by the artists Martin represents, some of your favorites(!): Martha Willeto, Jimmy Secatero and Elgin Tom. Mark your calendars now and stay tuned for more details.
 Examples of shaped and polished turquoise stones from the following turquoise mines in Nevada and Morenci in Arizona: (beginning at 12:00, clockwise): Stenich, Royston, New Lander (chalcosiderite), Indian Mountain, Morenci, Carico Lake, Lightning Stenich, Pilot Mountain, Blue Gem, Gold Acres, Blue Gem and Royston in the center.
 
Old stock of rough Nevada turquoise, referred to as Aurora; these were found in a similar district as the ancient lakebed where Carico Lake turquoise is currently found.
 

DID YOU KNOW?!

There is a beautiful NEW magazine that just started publishing this 2017 year – “Native American Art Magazine” – which has filled the gap of the formerly-published American Indian Art Magazine and Native Peoples Magazine. We encourage you to get more information for online or hard-copy subscriptions.

TAKE A LOOK AT A BOOK!

Take a Look at a Book and enjoy having a “museum collection on your lap”! Many titles are still discounted 20% (while supplies last) as we pare down our selection, and here are a couple of interesting titles for you to take a look at!


Pueblo Indian Painting

Tradition and Modernism in New Mexico, 1900-1930


Indian Basketry of the Northeastern Woodlands

By Sarah Peabody Turnbaugh and William A. Turnbaugh


Hopi Katsina 1600 Artist Biographies

By Gregory Schaaf assisted by Angie Yan Schaaf
 
 

WHAT OUR VISITORS ARE SAYING

“Great exhibition and store. From Minnesota."
"Nice and beautiful creations! Love everything from owls to hens to pots to jewelry! The patterns and skill (are) just amazing! Come here every time I’m in town and it hasn’t failed to impress me!"
"Great space; beautiful displays. What a great way to support Native American art.
"
 

REMINDER!

We’re open the third Saturday each month, which will be this Saturday,
November 18, 2017 from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  We look forward to seeing you!

ORDERING ONLINE
FOR PICK-UP AT THE SHOP


Yes, you may order online for pickup at the Shop!
If you would like to order online and pick up in the Shop, please fill in your “Ship To” address as the Shop’s street address – 1849 C Street, NW, Washington, DC 20240.  This way, the appropriate DC sales tax will be charged and we can then credit your shipping cost back to your method of payment after the online sale goes through.  In the “comment section” of your order, let us know that you will be picking up your order and we’ll have it ready for you!

We look forward to seeing you in the Shop and our Online store.

PLAN YOUR VISIT


Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 
The 3rd Saturday of each month - 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Closed on federal holidays

We’re open Saturday, November 18, 2017

Building Access
 All adults must present a valid photo ID to enter the building.
All visitors are subject to security screenings, including bag and parcel checks.


Get more details and map: www.indiancraftshop.com

The Indian Craft Shop, U.S. Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20240 
202-208-4056 
 

NEWS FROM THE DEPARTMENT
OF THE INTERIOR LIBRARY


REOPENING OF THE LIBRARY!
The staff of the Department of the Interior Library is pleased to announce that its newly renovated space has been reopened. The Library had been closed for three and a half years while the modernization of wing 1 of the Stewart Lee Udall Department of the Interior Building in Washington, DC was underway.
The newly modernized Library features a renovated Reading Room restored to the same grand appearance it had when the building first opened in 1937, and ​over 23,000 linear feet of movable compact shelving on two reconstructed basement floors and on the main level. A ​meeting ​room on the main level has also been added. Books and other Library materials have been returned from offsite storage and are ​ready for use once again by the Library's patrons.

We invite you to come visit the Library, enjoy our renovated Reading Room and explore our newly added features. The Library is located at 1849 C Street, NW, Room 1151 (just off the C Street lobby entrance) in Washington, DC.  The Library is open Monday through Friday (except federal holidays) from 7:45 am to 5:00 pm.

For more information about the Department of the Interior Library and Library services available to patrons, please call the Library's Reference Desk at (202) 208-5815, contact via e-mail library@ios.doi.gov or visit the Library's website.

 WHAT’S HAPPENING AT THE INTERIOR MUSEUM


UPCOMING PROGRAM:
Rachel Carson: Conservationist in Action

 
Thursday, December 14, 2017,
1:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.,
Rachel Carson Room
 
Rachel Carson spent 16 years working for the Fish and Wildlife Service and its predecessors, most of them in the Interior Department's headquarters building.  Carson's time as a federal employee proved critical for her success as a best-selling author of books like "The Sea Around Us" and "Silent Spring."  Join USFWS Historian, Mark Madison, Ph.D. to learn more about Rachel Carson's work as a federal employee which allowed her to help spur many of the critical issues that define the modern environmental movement.

Special Assistance - For those in need of special assistance (such as an interpreter for the hearing impaired) or inquiries regarding the accessible entrance, please notify museum staff at (202) 208-4743 in advance of the program. Special needs will be accommodated whenever possible.

Get more information on The Interior Museum and Event Schedule 
 

MURAL TOURS

Discover the art and architecture that made the Stewart Lee Udall Department of the Interior Building a "symbol of a new day" during the Great Depression. Tours are offered at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Please call the Museum in advance of your visit at 202.208.4743 to make a reservation.
Themes of the Bureau of Indian Affairs: Indian and Soldier," Maynard Dixon, 1939.
Fine Arts Program U.S. General Services Administration

THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING THE ARTS!

The Indian Craft Shop - a museum experience, an oasis of arts, a great escape from daily pressures and, of course, a great place to treat yourself or someone near and dear to a special, meaningful gift.

Thank you for your continued support of the arts - we truly appreciate you!
 
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Website
View PDF
Copyright © 2017 Indian Crafts Shop, All rights reserved.



Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list